No. 10 — Pages 96-97: Moacyr Marques ‘Bijú’ | Paulo Moura | Sambalanço Trio

  • Paulo Moura — Mensagem
    (1968) Equipe EQC 6001
  • Paulo Moura — Paulo Moura Interpreta Radamés Gnattali
    (1959) Continental LPP 3078
  • Dwike Mitchell, Willie Ruff — A Viagem
    (1966) Forma 102 VDL
  • Eumir Deodato — Inútil Paisagem – As Maiores Composições de Antônio Carlos Jobim
    (1964) Forma FM-1
  • Sambalanço Trio — Sambalanço Trio
    (1964) Som Maior SM 1510
  • Tamba Trio — Reza/Só Tinha de Ser com Você/Samba de Verão/Samblues
    (1965) Philips 440.680 PT
  • Quarteto em Cy, Luis Carlos Vinhas, Chico Feitosa, Eumir Deodato, Dulce Nunes, Sérgio Ricardo, Bossa Três, Moacir Santos, Ana Margarida, Baden Powell — Forma ‘65
    (1966) Forma FM-11
  • Paulo Moura — Paulo Moura Quarteto
    (1969) Equipe EQC 6003
  • Moacyr Marques ‘Bijú’ — Jazz & Bossa Nova
    (1960) Tiger LP TR-005
  • Sambossa 5 — Zero Hora
    (1966) RCA Victor BBL 1382
  • Embalo Trio — Embalo Trio
    (1965) RCA Victor BBL 1352
  • Bossa Jazz Trio — Bossa Jazz Trio
    (1965) Fermata FB 113

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This double page spread from the book features two of Brazil’s most notable saxophonists, Moacyr Marques aka ‘Bijú’ and Paulo Moura.

Moacyr Marques da Silva (*1927) aka ‘Bijú’ started with the clarinet as a child. Changing to tenor saxophone and clarion, he shared his first teacher with Moacir Santos, before becoming a student at the Conservatório Brasileiro de Música. In 1953, he joined Ary Barroso’s orchestra and toured Mexico. Moacyr Marques was a member of several radio orchestras as well as of the major labels Copacabana and Odeon. As a founder and member of the Orquestra da Rede Globo de Televisão he was part of all Festivais Internacionais da Canção Popular in the sixties and seventies broadcasted by Globo TV.

Moacyr Marques worked as a renowned session musician in Brazil for the likes of Dom Um Romão, Chico Buarque, Guio de Moraes and Elizeth Cardoso, and internationally with Henry Mancini, Samy Davis Jr., Nelson Riddle, Billy Eckstine, Sarah Vaughan and others.

The excellent Jazz & Bossa Nova, recorded with Zequinha on piano, Artur Barbosa on bass and Wilson das Neves on drums, was Moacyr Marques’ debut in 1960. Four more very fine albums were to follow under his name until 1962 including A Você Debutante, Samba 40 Graus, No Balanço do Samba and Samba Geléia. All were recorded with his group of alternating members of the Orquestra da Rede Globo de Televisão, occasionally featuring vocals by Edgardo Luis, Humberto Garin, Geraldo Ney and Rhair Vieira. In 1964, the uncredited Conjunto Bembossa released an album named Birimbau Sambas, with several songs being original recordings from Samba 40 Graus, compiled with other songs by Zito Righi.

Playlist Moacyr Marques ‘Bijú’
1. My Funny Valentine (Richard Rodgers – Lorenz Hart) from the album Jazz & Bossa Nova (1960)
2. Vivendo e Aprendendo (Ed Lincoln – Sylvio Cézar) from the album Samba 40 Graus (1961) featuring Humberto Garin
3. Meu Nome é Ninguém (Haroldo Barbosa – Luis Reis) from the album Samba Geléia (1962)
4. Mestre Tempo (Moacyr Marques) from the album No Balanço do Samba (1961) featuring Edgardo Luis
5. A Canção Que Virou Você (Luis Antônio) from the album Samba 40 Graus (1961)
6. Idéias Erradas (Ribamar – Dolores Duran) from the album Jazz & Bossa Nova (1960)
7. Foi a Noite (Antônio Carlos Jobim – Newton Mendonça) from the album Samba Geléia (1962)
8. Doralice (Dorival Caymmi – Antônio Almeida)from the album Samba 40 Graus (1961) featuring Geraldo Ney
9. Nossa Felicidade (Edgardo Luis – Álvaro Franco) from the album Samba Geléia (1962) featuring Edgardo Luis
10. A Taste of Honey (Bobby Scott – Ric Marlow) from the album Nôvo Sabôr (1964)

All of Moacyr Marques’ albums show attractive covers. The uncredited art work for Jazz & Bossa Nova is a delightful combination of a double-layered photograph and a typeset looking like a cardboard cutout.


Art work for Embalo Trio is by Tebaldo with photographs by Nicanor.

   

The art work for Bossa Jazz Trio is by Tide Hellmeister:


Paulo Gonçalves de Moura (1932-2010) mastered the clarinet, alto and tenor saxophone. He was the youngest of ten siblings in a very musical family. All six brothers became professional musicians, being taught by their father in order to prevent them from the infantry in the looming 2nd World War. Paulo Moura studied with musicians like Guerra-Peixe, Moacir Santos and Cipó, and at the age of 19 he already worked as a session musician on recordings by singers Nelson Gonçalves, Dircinha Batista and Núbia Lafayette. Paulo Moura was part of the orchestras of Zaccarias and Osvaldo Borba amongst others. He toured Mexico with Ary Barroso and his orchestra in 1953, just like Moacyr Marques, before assembling his first own orchestra at the age of 23.

In 1956 Paulo Moura cut his first single, featuring Moto Perpétuo by Niccolò Paganini, of which the public assumed it must be a trick recording since there was no audible breathing in his sax playing.

Apart from the eight albums he released in the fifties and sixties under his own name, Paulo Moura was part of Sérgio Mendes‘ Bossa Rio Sextet, recording with Julian ‘Cannonball’ Adderley, as well as of Os Cobras (the 1964 outfit), Os Gatos and Édison Machado’s ensemble for his legendary Édison Machado e Samba Nôvo, before cutting his two classic albums Mensagem and Paulo Moura Quarteto. Internationally, he also worked with Nat ‘King’ Cole, Lena Horne, Sammy Davis Jr. and Marlene Dietrich.

Playlist Paulo Moura:
1. Eu e a Brisa (Johnny Alf) from the album Paulo Moura Quarteto (1969)
2. Bonita (Antônio Carlos Jobim) from the album Mensagem (1968)
3. Outubro (Milton Nascimento) from the album Mensagem (1968)
4. Penumbra (Radamés Gnattali) from the album Paulo Moura Interpreta Radamés Gnattali (1959)
5. Saxologia (Vadico) from the album Escolha… E Dance com Paulo Moura  (1958)
6.Witchcraft (Carolyn Leigh – Cy Coleman) from the album Sweet Sax (1958)
7. Vagalume (Toso Gomes – Umberto Silva – Luis Mergulhão) from the album Tangos e Boleros (1960)
8. Carioca 1959 (Radamés Gnattali) from the album Paulo Moura Interpreta Radamés Gnattali (1959)

The art work for Mensagem is by Hélio Maia showing a painting by Selma Knupfer.


    Various — Forma ‘65 (b)

The gatefold sleeve for Inútil Paisagem – As Maiores Composições de Antônio Carlos Jobim shows a painting by Patrícia Tattersfield.

Eumir Deodato — Inútil Paisagem – As Maiores Composições de Antônio Carlos Jobim (c) inside left   Eumir Deodato — Inútil Paisagem – As Maiores Composições de Antônio Carlos Jobim (d) inside right

Eumir Deodato — Inútil Paisagem – As Maiores Composições de Antônio Carlos Jobim (b) back


Sambalanço Trio was formed by César Camargo Mariano on piano, Humberto Clayber on bass and Airto Moreira on drums, starting as a favourite at the João Sebastião Bar in Sao Pãolo. Although the group existed only two years, Sambalanço Trio is yet considered as one of the most influencial samba jazz formations.

The trio released three albums under their own name, the first two aptly titled Sambalanço Trio Vol. 1 and Sambalanço Trio Vol. 2, followed by Reencontro com Sambalanço Trio. In addition, the group recorded two collaborations: they backed trombonist Raul de Souza on his stellar À Vontade Mesmo, and they recorded a studio version of the successful theatrical performance they shared with Lennie Dale in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Pãolo.

Playlist Sambalanço Trio:
1. Sambinha (César Camargo Mariano – Humberto Clayber) from the album Sambalanço Trio Vol. 1 (1964)
2. Razão de Viver (Eumir Deodato – Paulo Sergio Valle) from the album Reencontro com Sambalanço Trio (1965)
3. O Morro Não Tem Vez (Antônio Carlos Jobim – Vinícius de Moraes) from the album Sambalanço Trio Vol. 1 (1964)
4. Berimbau (Baden Powell – Vinicius de Moraes) from the album Sambalanço Trio Vol. 1 (1964)

The cover of Sambalanço Trio Vol. 1 was released in two different versions on Áudio Fidelity and Som Maior. The art work is unidentified.

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3 thoughts on “No. 10 — Pages 96-97: Moacyr Marques ‘Bijú’ | Paulo Moura | Sambalanço Trio

  1. The Sambalanco Trio Vol.1 from Som Maior cover is really cool, I only knew the other one (aka Samblues). Vol.2 is also known as Improviso Negro and then there was even a third album from1965, released by Som Maior and called “Reencontro Com Sambalanco Trio”. Definitely one of my favourite Bossa Jazz Trios !

    1. To my knowledge “Improvisio Negro” is the title on the cd-reissue, not the original album. Therefore I didn’t mention it. But you caught me with the other one – I will update this post right away.
      Thanks!

  2. And you are certainly right with Vol.2 – Improviso Negro is only the title of the CD I just hold in my hand :)
    Frank

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