No. 39 — Pages 176-177: Agostinho dos Santos | Fats Elpídio | André Penazzi

  • André Penazzi — Órgão/Balanço/Percussão
    (1965) Som Maior SMLP 1504
  • Milton Banana — Milton Banana Trio
    (1965) Odeon MOFB 3417
  • Milton Banana — Milton Banana Trio
    (1965) Imperial IMP 30.210
  • Elizeth Cardoso, Zimbo Trio — Balançam na Sucata
    (1969) Copacabana CLP 11578
  • Paulinho Nogueira — A Nova Bossa é Violão
    (1964) RGE XRLP 5227
  • Bob Fleming — Bob Fleming
    (1961) Musidisc XPL-6
  • Agostinho dos Santos — Vanguarda
    (1964) RGE XRLP 5231
  • Conjunto Balambossa — Samba ao Vivo
    (196?) Coledisc CD 012
  • MPB-4 — MPB-4
    (1967) Elenco ME-43
  • Dulce Nunes, Guerra Peixe — Dulce
    (1966) Forma FM-13
  • Fats Elpídio — Fat’s Samba
    (1964) Copacabana CLP 11393
  • Claudionor Germano, Nelson Ferreira — Capiba – 24 Anos de Frevo
    (1959) Mocambo LP 40039
  • André Penazzi — Órgão… Samba… Percussão Vol. 2
    (1966) Som Maior SMLP 1521
  • André Penazzi — Órgão… Samba… Percussão Vol. 2
    (1963) Áudio Fidelity DFM 3021
    André Penazzi — Órgão… Samba… Percussão
    (1962) Áudio Fidelity DFM 3020

This double-page spread from the book features one of the finest crooners, a very versatile pianist and a hypodermic needle.

Singer and composer Agostinho dos Santos (1932-1973) began his artistic life in the early fifties, singing in the clubs of São Paulo. Taking the chance provided by established orchestra leaders at that time, to perform as a freshman with their bands, he appeared as a crooner with Osmar Milani’s orchestra and got hired by Rádio América de São Paulo. His recording debut was the samba Rasga Teu Verso in 1952, issued with Carro Amarelo by Cabo Pitanga as the b-side.

In 1955, after the initial success of Agostinho dos Santos’ first solo single, O Vendedor de Laranjas b/w A Última Vez Que Vi Paris (The Last Time I Saw Paris), his career took off quickly. Commercially, 1955 to 1961 were his most successful period, when he scored eleven singles consecutively among the year’s top 100 hits, including Até Logo, Jacaré, a cover of See You Later, Alligator by Bill Haley & His Comets, Se Todos Fossem Iguais a Você by Antônio Carlos Jobim and Vinícius de Moraes, Balada Triste by Dalton Vogeler and Esdras Pereira da Silva, and Estrada do Sol by Antônio Carlos Jobim and Dolores Duran. In 1957, Uma Voz e Seus Sucessos became Agostinho dos Santos debut album, followed by 16 other original albums until his untimely death in 1973 in an airplane accident near Paris on Varig Flight 820.

1958 saw two album releases, Agostinho Espetacular and Antônio Carlos Jobim e Fernando César Na Voz de Agostinho Dos Santos from which the latter led to an invitation from Antônio Carlos Jobim and Vinícius de Moraes to record for the upcoming movie Orfeu Negro by Marcel Camus. Although João Gilberto also auditioned for the vocal part, he was refused as his voice was unsurprisingly considered not ‘black’ enough. Orfeu Negro, apart from being a movie classic, featured some memorable songs such as A Felicidade by Antônio Carlos Jobim and Manhã de Carnaval by Luiz Bonfá, both with lyrics by Vinícius de Moraes. Even though Agostinho dos Santos incomprehensibly was not credited for dubbing the vocal performances of Breno Mello as the leading character Orfeu, his interpretations of these songs became landmark performances and boosted his career with offers for appearances worldwide.

In 1960, he introduced one of Antônio Carlos Jobim and Vinícius de Moraes’ most covered songs, O Amor em Paz, issued from his album Agostinho, Sempre Agostinho, and yet again one of the years’s most popular singles. In 1962, when bossa nova visited Carnegie Hall, his voice and singing, backed by Oscar Castro Neves and his band, was praised by New York critics. In 1963, Agostinho dos Santos and Rosana Tolédo recorded Samba em Prelúdio by Baden Powell and Vinícius de Moraes—not only one of the few duets in Brazilian pop music of the sixties but presumably the only one recorded in two versions with reversed parts (→ No. 13 — Pages 24-25). The following album Vanguarda introduced a slight change of style in Agostinho dos Santos’ repertoire moving towards more jazzy arrangements like Negro by Roberto Menescal and Ronaldo Bôscoli. After leaving the label RGE, this approach was continued with albums like Agostinho dos Santos in 1966, arranged by Paulo Moura, Agostinho dos Santos in 1967, accompanied by Yansã Quarteto, Música Nossa in 1967, featuring two duets with the still unknown Beth Carvalho, and Agostinho dos Santos in 1973, including Édison Machado on drums.

Blessed with a distinctice timbre and range, Agostinho dos Santos was one of Brazil’s most skilled singers, and one of the few to successfully manage the transition from the fifties to the musical renewals of the sixties initiated by the bossa nova movement. Wether backed by lush orchestrations or the intimate setting of a small combo, he moved between the various genres with great sophistication, even though his coaxing baritone with the light vibrato flourished best in ballads.

Playlist Agostinho dos Santos:
1.A Felicidade (Antônio Carlos Jobim – Vinícius de Moraes) from the album Inimitável (1959)
2. Negro (Roberto Menescal – Ronaldo Bôscoli) from the album Vanguarda (1964)
3. Foi a Noite (Antônio Carlos Jobim – Newton Mendonça) from the album Agostinho dos Santos (1973)
4. O Amor Em Paz (Antônio Carlos Jobim – Vinícius de Moraes) from the album Agostinho, Sempre Agostinho (1960)
5. Mulher de Trinta (Luis Antônio) from the album Agostinho Canta Sucessos (1961)
6. Canção do Mar (Frederico Brito – Ferrer Trindade) from the single Canção do Mar b/w Pif Paf (Dança das Damas) (1956)
7. Sede de Amor (Mário Albanese) from the album Agostinho Espetacular (1958)
8. Eu e a Brisa (Johnny Alf) from the album Música Nossa (1967)
9. Manhã de Carnaval (Luiz Bonfá – Vinícius de Moraes) from the album Agostinho dos Santos (1969)
10. Canto de Ossanha (Baden Powell – Vinícius de Moraes) from the album Agostinho dos Santos (1966)

The artwork for Vanguarda is unidentified.


Conjunto Balambossa - Samba ao Vivo (c1961) a    Conjunto Balambossa - Samba ao Vivo (c1961) b

The sharply reduced art work for Bob Fleming is by Joselito.

Bob Fleming — Bob Fleming (a)    Bob Fleming — Bob Fleming (b)


Elpídio Sales Meneses Pessoa (*1913), nicknamed ‘Fats’ due to a certain physical resemblance to american jazz pianist ‘Fats’ Waller, is the brother of trumpeter Ayres da Costa Pessoa aka Pernambuco.

Fats Elpídio started piano lessons at the age of  eight. At the age of 17, he joined the orchestra of Jonas Silva for two years. After that, he appeared in the clubs of Recife along with his family, known as the Irmãos Pessoa, before moving on to Romeu Silva’s orchestra. In 1938, Fats Elpídio initiated the first jazz concert in Rio deJaneiro at the Fluminense Football Clube. During the early forties, he toured with the Orquestra de Fon Fon, before joining Zaccarias’ orchestra until the mid-fifties. Apart from his appearances and recordings as Zaccarias’ pianist, Fat Elpídio recorded five singles with fellow pianist João Leal Brito aka Britinho in 1952 and 1953.

In 1955, he recorded his debut album, Fats Elpídio Homenageia Zequinha de Abreu, accompanied only by accoustic guitar, which was followed by eleven more solo albums until 1964. As a band member, he participated in six albums by Zaccaria’s Quarteto Excelsior until 1961. Besides, he was part of the one-time projects Sexteto de Jazz Moderno and Orquestra Os Bossambistas aka Bossa Brass. In the late sixties and early seventies, Fats Elpídio joined Severino Araújo’s famous Orquestra Tabajara and worked with Elza Soares and Eliana Pittman.

In his long career, Fats Elpídio firmly established himself as one of the most versatile among Brazil’s numerous fine pianists.

Playlist Fats Elpídio:
1. Sangue Quente (Moacyr Silva – Antônio Maria) from the album Fat’s Samba (1964)
2. Vertical (Orlandivo – Roberto Jorge) from the album Samba na Madrugada (1962)
3. Último Beijo (Zéquinha de Abreu) from the album Fats Elpídio Homenagem a Zéquinha de Abreu (1955)
4. Menina Moça (Luis Antônio) from the album Piano Bossa Nova (1960)
5. O Barquinho (Roberto Menescal – Ronaldo Bôscoli) from the album Bossa Nova (1963) by Sexteto de Jazz Moderno
6. Dance o Maxixe (Jorge Bernardo – Mário Pereira) from the album HI-FATS Elpidio Toca Para Você Dançar (1959)

The artwork for Fat’s Samba is by Sérgio Malta.

Fats Elpídio — Fat’s Samba (a)

Fats Elpídio — Fat’s Samba (b)


The artwork for Milton Banana Trio is by Moacyr Rocha with photograph by Auliano.

Milton Banana — Milton Banana Trio (1a)    Milton Banana — Milton Banana Trio (1b)

Milton Banana — Milton Banana Trio (2)    Milton Banana — Milton Banana Trio (3)

The artwork for Capiba – 24 Anos de Frevo is by Orlando da Costa Ferreira with photographs by Berzin.

Claudionor Germano, Nelson Ferreira — Capiba – 24 Anos de Frevo (a)    Claudionor Germano, Nelson Ferreira — Capiba – 24 Anos de Frevo (b)

The artwork for Dulce is uncredited with photographs by Paulo Lorgus.

Dulce Nunes, Guerra Peixe — Dulce (a)    Dulce Nunes, Guerra Peixe — Dulce (b)


Organist André Penazzi is very hard to research, except for having released more than a dozen albums between 1959 and 1971. He started as a pianist in São Paulo, working also for several radio stations, and travelling the night club circuit of Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo. For a few years he gained international reputation to some degree with his jazzy but extravagant organ playing.

Playlist André Penazzi:
1.Tamanco no Samba (Orlandivo – Hélton Menezes) from the album Órgão, Samba, Percussão Vol. 2 (1963)

In 1960, Audio Fidelity launched a series of at least two dozen albums sporting the slogan “Doctored for Super Sound” and “Doctored for Super Stereo”, often with lavish gatefold sleeves. To emphasize the “doctored” sound quality, early artworks show a hypodermic needle as a trademark. Until the series’ termination in the mid 1970’s, the repertoire featured dance music with fancy titles such as Jet Set Discotheque and Percussive Vaudville as well as numerous sound effect recordings including Bob Prescott Presents Cartoons in Stereo and the questionable Small War, Medium War, Large War Sound Effects.

The artwork for Órgão… Samba… Percussão Vol. 2 is by Oscar Costa.

The label Som Maior recreated Audio Fidelity’s “Doctored for Super Sound” design with the trade mark syringe for their reissue of Órgão… Samba… Percussão Vol. 2 in 1966.

Oscar Costa’s cover for the first volume of André Penazzi’s Órgão… Samba… Percussão in 1962 was originally used two years earlier in the US for Bobby Christian’s Percussive Big Band Jazz.

André Penazzi — Órgão... Samba... Percussão (1962) (a)    Bobby_Christian_01_1960


The artwork for A Nova Bossa é Violão is by Tide Hellmeister.

Paulinho Nogueira — A Nova Bossa é Violão (2)    Paulinho Nogueira — A Nova Bossa é Violão (a)

Paulinho Nogueira — A Nova Bossa é Violão (b)

   

Elizete Cardoso, Zimbo Trio — Balançam na Sucata


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