Pseudonyms — Pt. 2: João Leal Brito ‘Britinho’

Pianist, composer, conductor and arranger João Adelino Leal Brito, popularly known as ‘Britinho’, is known for his pseudonym Pierre Kolmann, but he has used at least ten more in just seven years. And just like Ed Lincoln, he started when he joined the label Musidisc in 1957.

Born in 1917, Britinho grew up in a musical family where he learned to play the piano at an early age. At 18 he was already working for radio stations and at 21 he began his career in nightclubs located on Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, such as Perroquet, Vogue and the famous Casablanca, where he was the orchestrator and arranger of shows between 1952 and 1956. After leaving the Casablanca, he dedicated his career almost exclusively to phonographic production.

Britinho’s recordings began in 1951 and when he joined Musidisc in 1957, he was already a well-established recording artist with 28 own single and album releases and 19 participations. Until then, his name appeared on his recordings as João Leal Brito, Britinho or Leal Brito but that changed when he was produced by Nilo Sérgio.

When Sérgio founded Musidisc in 1953, he used as a producer what he had learned in the USA when he tried to continue his career as a singer there with little success. He created studio groups such as Les 4 Cadillacs, Los Latinos, The Lovers and The Masterpiece Strings, usually arranged and conducted by his musical director Edmundo Peruzzi, and he invented numerous pseudonyms for musicians in order to record them with a repertoire that mostly mixed national and international hits and styles, such as Bob Fleming for saxophonist Moacyr Silva, Os Violinos Mágicos, Henry Nirenberg for bandleader Léo Peracchi and Don Pablo de Havana for pianist/organist Ed Lincoln.

These formulas were very successful, but Britinho’s top-selling debut as Pierre Kolmann in 1957 with Para Dançar – Pierre Kolmann e Seu Conjunto (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2002) sparked great controversy with pianist Waldir Calmon’s recording company Rádio whose lawyers tried to confiscate Para Dançar from the stores as well as from the label. Rádio assumed Musidisc to have published recordings by Waldir Calmon, who was exclusively under contract with them, with the similar-sounding name Kolmann. They also considered the title Para Dançar to be based on Colman’s successful album series Feito Para Dançar. Britinho appeared to be quite indifferent to the excitement, presumably because this success under a pseudonym was simply a lucrative income. It can be assumed that Nilo Sérgio invented the name Kolmann deliberately, because the repertoire corresponded to the formula of Calmon’s Feito Para Dançar series of recording international and national hits as piano music with a small backing band – instrumental dance music with which you could create the atmosphere of a nightclub at home. As a good businessman, Nilo Sérgio had the name Pierre Kolmann protected and was therefore able to continue using it. And so the success of the Para Dançar series could continue with ten more albums until Britinho left Musidisc in 1962.

   

After Rádio had learned in 1958 after a court hearing that Musidisc’s Pierre Kolmann is actually Britinho, Nilo Sérgio combined him with the equally popular Trio Surdina for his eighth Kolmann album Boleros em Hi-Fi – Trio Surdina com Pierre Kolmann ao Piano.

In the same year Britinho released two more albums with alias names. The name Franca Villa appeared on the album Dançando no Estoril for Sinter with Portuguese repertoire while the album Arco-Iris Músical for Columbia was credited to Al Brito.

    

In 1959, Britinho began recording at least eight albums for Polydor under the name Tito Romero. As with previous pseudonyms, neither Polydor nor the covers explained who Tito Romero was, which led to speculation that it was the pianist and arranger Romeu Fossati. It is unclear whether both possibly even shared this alias.

   

   

1959 also saw the release of the album Mirian Presley e Seu Piano, a female pseudonym often attributed to Djalma Ferreira but used by Britinho for this album released by Ferreira’s label Drink.

In 1960 Britinho took the pseudonym Al Person on the first album of the newly founded label Sideral, O Máximo do Gênero. 

In 1961 Britinho only released the album Quiero Que Me Beses under his own name, but no recordings using an alias name.

1962 was the year of Britinho’s last pseudonym, Al Newman, with which he recorded two albums for Som/Copacabana.

   

Three more pseudonyms – Milton-Z, Jone Braith, and John Britt – are sometimes attributed to Britinho but are not verified and therefore do not appear in the list below.

Apart from Altamiro Carrilho’s Turma da Gafieira (1957, Musidisc Hi-Fi 1), Britinho also worked in various studio bands, whose musicians were not credited on the album covers: Sexteto Prestige, Sexteto Espetacular, Sexteto Guanabara and Quarteto Monte Carlo.

    

   

Occasionally, Os Violinistas de Copacabana is mentioned as one of these groups. Britinho arranged the tracks on the B-side of her only album Cordas Mágicas from 1960.

When Britinho died of complications from a heart attack at the age of 49 in 1966, he had released at least 79 singles and albums. The information on this varies, but from 1957 to 1963 at least 39 of them were published with pseudonyms.

A chronological but possibly incomplete list:

1957

Pierre KolmannPara Dançar – Pierre Kolmann e Seu Conjunto (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2002)

   
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Including Night and Day (Cole Porter):

Pierre KolmannPara Dançar (EP) (Musidisc Hi-Fi 5008)


Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Pierre KolmannPara Dançar – Pierre Kolmann e Seu Conjunto (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2006)

   
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Including História de um Amor (Carlos Almarán):

Pierre KolmannPara Dançar (EP) (Musidisc Hi-Fi 5020)


Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra


1958

Pierre KolmannPara Dançar – Pierre Kolmann e Seu Conjunto (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2011)

Including Confiança (Alcebíades Nogueira-Luis de França):

Pierre KolmannMúsica de Caymmi em Hi-Fi (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2012)

    
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mario Hora Jr.

Pierre KolmannMúsica de Caymmi em Hi-Fi (EP) (Musidisc Hi-Fi 5026)


Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mario Hora Jr.

Pierre KolmannPara Dançar (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2015)

    
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Including Ouça (Maysa) featuring Toni Vestane:

Trio Surdina com Pierre Kolmann Boleros em Hi-fi – Trio Surdina com Pierre Kolmann ao Piano (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2018)

   
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Including Esperame en el Cielo (Francisco Lopez Vidal ‘Paquito‘):

Franca VillaDançando no Estoril (Sinter SLP 1749)

   

Al BritoArco-Iris Músical – Al Brito e Seu Piano (Columbia LPCB 37035)

   

Sexteto PrestigeMúsica e Festa (Prestige DLP-1001)

    

Including Eu Quero um Samba / Faceira / Sonho e Fantasia / Sal e Pimenta (Haroldo Barbosa-Janet de Almeida / Ary Barroso / João Leal Brito ‘Britinho’ / Nazareno de Brito-Newton Ramalho):

Sexteto PrestigeMúsica e Festa N° 2 (Prestige DLP-1002)

   


1959

Pierre KolmannNovamente – Pierre Kolmann e sua Orquestra (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2028)

   

Including Smoke Gets in Your Eyes (Jerome Kern-Otto Harbach):

Tito RomeroSambas Maravilhosos – Tito Romero com Orquestra de Cordas (Polydor LPNG 4032)

   

Tito RomeroSucessos Brasileiros em Ritmo de Tango – Tito Romero e Sua Orquestra Típica (Polydor LPNG 4039)

   

Including Sombras (O. Trinca-Alberto Paz):

Tito RomeroBoleros Maravilhosos – Tito Romero e Sua Orquestra (Polydor LPNG 4045)

   

Tito RomeroChoros Maravilhosos – Tito Romero e Sua Orquestra (Polydor LPNG 4047)

Tito RomeroEles Tocam Assim (Polydor LPNG 4049)
Various artist’s compilation

   

Sexteto PrestigeFestival Prestige – Primeiro Aniversário (Prestige DLP-A-001)
Various artist’s compilation

    

Sexteto PrestigeMúsica e Festa N° 3 (Prestige DLP 1005)

   

Sexteto PrestigeMúsica e Festa N° 4 (Prestige DLP 1008)

    

Quarteto Monte CarloBoite a Surprise (Prestige DLP 1009)

Including Clair de Lune (Claude Debussy):

Mirian PresleyMirian Presley e Seu Piano (Discos Drink LPP-DF- 13.002)

   

Including As Time Goes By (Herman Hupfeld):

Tony Vestane com Pierre KolmannOuça (Musidisc HIFI 5008)

Including Dorinha Meu Amor (José Francisco de Freitas):

Sexteto EspetacularPara Sua Festa (Copacabana CLP 11078)

   

Including Viva o Samba / Exaltação a Bahia / Casadinhos / É Luxo Só (Altamiro Carrilho / Vicente Paiva-Chianca de Garcia / Luis Bittencourt-Tuiu / Ary Barroso-Luis Peixoto):


1960

Tito RomeroMelodias do Céu na Inspiraçao de Haroldo Eiras – Tito Romero e Sua Orquestra (Polydor LPNG 4047)

Al PersonO Máximo do Gênero – Al Person e Seu Ritmo (Sideral LPP 2001)

   

Sexteto PrestigeFestival Prestige – Segundo Aniversário (Prestige DLP-A-002)
Various artist’s compilation

    

Sexteto PrestigeMúsica e Festa N° 5 (Prestige DLP 1013)

   

Quarteto Monte CarloDrink Musical (Prestige DLP 1015)

   

Including J’attendrai (Tornerai) (Dino Olivieri-Nino Rastelli-Louis Poterat):

Sexteto PrestigeMúsica e Festa N° 6 (Prestige DLP 1016)

    

Sexteto PrestigeSambas Exclusivamente Sambas (Prestige DLP 1018)
Compilation album

   

Os Violinistas de Copacabana → Cordas Mágicas (Copacabana CLP 11150)

   


1962

Pierre KolmannDance com Musidisc Vol. 1 (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2059)

Pierre KolmannSeleção de Sucessos Nº 1 (Musidisc Hi-Fi 2061)
Compilation album

   

Al NewmanClub dos 7 – Al Newman e Seu Conjunto (Som/Copacabana SOLP 40027)

   

Al NewmanMeu amor… Você – Al Newman e Orquestra (Som/Copacabana SOLP 40042)

   

Sexteto GuanabaraSorvete Dançante (Musiplay LPM 1001)

   

Including Meu Nome é Ninguém (Haroldo Barbosa-Luis Reis):


1963

Pierre KolmannO Romance em Bolero (Audiola/Musidisc AD-20)
Compilation album

Sexteto GuanabaraSorvete Dançante Vol. 2 (Musiplay LPM 1106)

   

Sexteto GuanabaraSorvete Dançante Vol. 3 (Musiplay LPM 1108)

   

Pseudonyms — Pt. 1: Ed Lincoln

Of all the Brazilian musicians who have used pseudonyms in addition to their real names, Ed Lincoln certainly had most of them by at least 18.

Eduardo Lincoln Barbosa Sabóia made his first recording as Eduardo Lincoln in 1955 on the album Uma Noite no Plaza as part of Trio Plaza alongside Luiz Eça on piano and Paulo Ney on guitar. He kept that name on Noite e Dia, his collaboration album with Luiz Bonfá in 1957. The next year, he shortened his name to Ed Lincoln which first appeared in 1960 on his solo debut album Ao Teu Ouvido.

The same year, he joined Musidisc, a label founded and owned by Nilo Sérgio who had switched from singer and orchestra leader to record producer. One of Sérgio’s main goals was to enhance the quality of music production by using an exemplary echo chamber and the latest 4-channel recording technique while major studios were still using 2-channel recorders. An aspiration that he liked to emphasise with the aptly titled ‘Masterpiece’ tag on the covers as well as a sublabel and a series of the same name.

Sérgio founded also Nilser as his “de luxe” label whose albums were often produced with elaborate gatefold sleeves and die-cut front covers. Musidisc and Nilser were the first Brazilian labels to produce records in the new ‘Microgroove 33 RPM Long Playing’ system, to produce in Stereo as well as to stop the manufacturing of 78 rpms.

Being a trained pianist, Ed Lincoln switched to the electric organ in 1958 when he unexpectedly had to fill in for Djalma Ferreira. After this, the organ became Lincoln’s favourite instrument, and the one which brought him to fame. He was a trendsetter of sambalanço, a style that was extremely popular in the early 1960s, filling a kind of gap between samba and the newly emerged bossa nova which was considered not very suitable for dancing. Nilo Sérgio’s high-quality music production improved Ed Lincoln’s sound and thus his success during the heyday of the electric organ. He became a key player in Sérgio’s line-up working not only as an artist in his own name but as session musician, musical director, arranger and composer.

In 1960, Lincoln startet his use of pseudonyms with the name Don Pablo de Havana on the album Bolero Espetacular, also more appropriately released as Cha Cha Cha Espetacular. It is unclear wether Lincoln or Sérgio invented the name but Sérgio commonly invented names which only exist on records such as ‘Bob Fleming’ which first disguised Moacyr Silva in 1959 before being passed on to Zito Righi for at least 16 subsequent albums.

   

In 1961, Nilo Sérgio formed Les 4 Cadillacs, a studio group featuring Ed Lincoln which released five popular albums with instrumental versions of mostly international repertoire.

  

  

The same year, Nilo Sérgio also formed The Lovers, another successful outfit featuring Ed Lincoln which released three albums with light dance music.

   

In 1964, Ed Lincoln appeared as Eduardo Barbosa on the EP O Povo Canta, recorded and released by the Centro Popular de Cultura da U.N.E (CPC) in Rio de Janeiro, shortly before it was closed by order of the Military Government.

In 1965, Ed Lincoln started to use the name Cláudio Marcelo on an album that was released twice that year on different labels as Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 and Dance Suavemente.

   

In 1966, after Lincoln left Musidisc, his pseudonyms began to get confusing when Coledisc released three albums credited to Conjunto Balambossa, a name that is often stated as one of Lincoln’s aliases. However, the first and the third album, Poema do Adeus and Samba ao Vivo, only included recordings previously released by Celso Murilo and Fats Elpídio, whereas only the second one, Não Quero Ver Você Triste, is sort of a Ed Lincoln album—actually, it is Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 aka Dance Suavemente from the previous year which makes Não Quero Ver Você Triste by Conjunto Balambossa the re-release of an Ed Lincoln’s double alias release with a band‘s name that had already been used otherwise.

   

To add to the confusion, Cláudio Marcelo‘s debut album was reissued the same year as Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão. In the 1970s it was re-released three more times, in 1974 as Ternura Azul by Danny Marcel and as And I Love Her e Outros Sucessos by John Marcel, and in 1976 again as Ternura Azul, this time by Marcel Saboier. In summary, Cláudio Marcelo‘s debut album had been reissued six times over the course of 11 years using five names. Cláudio Marcelo became Ed Lincoln‘s most used pseudonym appearing on at least 11 albums until 1982, however, not always for his own recordings. Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 2 from 1972, for example, is a compilation of recordings released by Celso Murilo from 1961–63.

  

In 1968, Ed Lincoln founded his own short-lived label Savoya Discos. Apart from three releases with the name Ed Lincoln on the covers, he issued one single as DeSavoya e Seu Conjunto and one album as DeSavoya Combo, whereas his album titled De Savoya by De Savoya was released on Polydor in 1972.

    

In 1989, after his last Ed Lincoln album Novo Toque, he concentrated on producing and arranging but continued to record in his home studio. Allegedly since then he used the pseudonyms Orquestra Romance Tropical, Orquestra Los Angeles, Gloria Benson and TecnoOrquestra for new releases, but this seems not sufficiently proven which is why they are not listed below.

As a session musician, among others on Djalma Ferreira’s 1959 album Depois no Drink and João Donato’s 1965 album Sambou, Sambou, he is sometimes credited simply as Lincoln.

One might get the impression that Ed Lincoln enjoyed confusing his audience, but the reasons for his frequent use of pseudonyms are likely very simple. Don Pablo de Havana, Cláudio Marcelo and De Savoya, for example, were obviously pseudonyms for changes of style to satisfy the audience’s demand for mainstream music.

Some of these recordings were so successful that they were repeatedly marketed on different labels, either with their original or compiled track listings, but if that label did not own the rights of the recordings, the name could not be used either unless it was subordinate to the owning label. At the same time, however, this made it possible to create the impression that these were new recordings by new artists.

In summary, Ed Lincoln released more albums using pseudonyms than with his own name. Excluding compilations, he released about 16 albums as Ed Lincoln, at least 10 as part of a group but at least 45 albums with aliases.

A chronological but certainly incomplete list:

1960

Don Pablo de HavanaBolero Espetacular, also titled Cha Cha Cha Espetacular (Musidisc XPL-1)

   

   
Artwork with illustration by Aldemir Martins

Including Aquarela do Brasil (Ary Barroso):


1961

Les 4 CadillacsDoucement Novamente (Musidisc XPL-19)

   
Artwork by Joselito

The Lovers → Lover (Nilser NS 1001)

   


Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

The Lovers → Lover – Vol. 2 (Nilser NS 1005)

   


Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Including Amado Mio (Allan Roberts-Doris Fisher):


1962

Les 4 Cadillacs → Doucement, Mon Amour (Masterpiece Master 11029)

   
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Including La Mer (Charles Trenet):

The Lovers → Lover – Vol. 3 (Nilser NS 1020)

   
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra


1963

Les 4 Cadillacs → Doucement, Cherie (Masterpiece Master 11033)

   
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Les 4 Cadillacs → Les 4 Cadillacs (Masterpiece Master 11034)

   
Artwork by Joselito


1964

Eduardo Barbosa → O Povo Canta (EP) (C.P.C. Da U.N.E. ‎UNEC-001)
Featured soloist on Canção do Trilhãozinho.

Les 4 Cadillacs → Les 4 Cadillacs (Masterpiece Master 11035)

   
Artwork by Joselito with photograph by Mafra

Don Pablo de Havana → Garota de Ipanema (EP) (Nilser NS 19)

The Lovers → O Melhor de Lover (EP) (Nilser NS 21)


1965

The Lovers → Isto é Dynascope (Nilser NS 1021)
Various artists compilation.


Don Pablo de Havana → Ardente (Nilser NS 1022)

Cláudio Marcelo → Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 (Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7024)
Identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Dance Suavemente (1965, Paladium 7004) and Conjunto Balambossa’s Não Quero Ver Você Triste (1966, Coledisc ‎CD 020). Also identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão (1966, Destaque ‎C-7024) except for track Adventures in Paradise.

   
Artwork by Joselito

Cláudio Marcelo → Dance Suavemente (Paladium 7004)
Identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 (1965, Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7024) and Conjunto Balambossa’s Não Quero Ver Você Triste (1966, Coledisc ‎CD 020). Also identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão (1966, Destaque ‎C-7024) except for track Adventures in Paradise.

   
Artwork by Fernando

Including The Shadow of Your Smile (Johnny Mandel-Paul Francis Webster):


1966

Conjunto Balambossa → Não Quero Ver Você Triste (Coledisc ‎CD 020)
Identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Dance Suavemente (1965, Paladium 7004) and Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 (1965, Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7024). Also identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão (1966, Destaque ‎C-7024) except for track Adventures in Paradise.

   

Cláudio Marcelo → Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão (Destaque ‎C-7024)
Identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Dance Suavemente (1965, Paladium 7004), Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 (1965, Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7024) and Conjunto Balambossa’s Não Quero Ver Você Triste (1966, Coledisc ‎CD 020) except for track Mr. Kildare.

   


1967

The Lovers → 1º Festival de Ié Ié Ié (Rosicler/Chantecler R-7033)
Various artists compilation.


1968

Cláudio Marcelo → Som de Boite (Paladium PAL 203)

Including Manifesto (Mariozinho Rocha-Guto Graça Melo):


1969

De Savoya Combo → De Savoya Combo (Savoya Discos ‎SV-8002)

   

Including Jogaram o Caxangá (Ed Lincoln):

Cláudio Marcelo → Mais 17 Sucessos (Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7066)

Including L’amore Dice ‘Ciao’ (Armando Trovaioli):


1970

Cláudio Marcelo → Mais 17 Sucessos – Vol. 2 (Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7077)


1972

Cláudio Marcelo → Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 3 (CID 14023)

Cláudio Marcelo → Mais 17 Sucessos – Vol. 3 (Itamaraty/CID ITAM 14023)

De Savoya → De Savoya (Polydor ‎2451 011)


Including Ê Tum Dá (Ed Lincoln):


1973

Muchacho nas Boca → Um Sax Muito Louco (Equipe EQC-5069)
Collaboration album with Moacyr Silva.


Including Esperanças Perdidas (Adeílton Alves-Délcio Carvalho):

Ed Kennedy → Ed Kennedy (Star STLP 80122)
Including tracks from De Savoya Combo (1969, Savoya Discos ‎SV-8002)


1974

Ed Costa → Ed Costa Musicshow – Feito Para Dançar (Alvorada ‎CALP 8074)

Les Amants → Vida… Amor, Muito Amor em Forma de Música (Equipe 77025)

Danny Marcel → Ternura Azul (Esquema 1239015)
Identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 (1965, Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7024), Cláudio Marcelo’s Dance Suavemente (1965, Paladium 7004) and Conjunto Balambossa’s Não Quero Ver Você Triste (1966, Coledisc ‎CD 020). Also identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão (1966, Destaque ‎C-7024) except for track Adventures in Paradise.


John Marcel → And I Love Her e Outros Sucessos (Esquema 1239085)
Identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 (1965, Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7024), Cláudio Marcelo’s Dance Suavemente (1965, Paladium 7004) and Conjunto Balambossa’s Não Quero Ver Você Triste (1966, Coledisc ‎CD 020). Also identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão (1966, Destaque ‎C-7024) except for track Adventures in Paradise.

Cláudio Marcelo → Isto é Muito Bom – Vol. 2 (Itamaraty/CID 1967)
Various artists compilation.

Cláudio Marcelo → Espetacular – Vol. 6 (Itamaraty/CID 2131)


1976

Berry Benton → Lovin’ Motel – Vol. 1 (Tapecar SS.017)


1977

Ed Costa → Musicshow Ed Costa (Rosicler ‎2.12.407.238)


1978

The Lovers → Lovers Motel (Musidisc MLP – 7049)
Re-release of Lover (1961, Nilser NS 1001).


1979

Don Pablo de Havana → Disco Latin (Musidisc MLP 7050)


1982

Cláudio Marcelo → De Coração a Coração – Vol. 3 (Itamaraty/CID 4122)


1991

Marcel Saboier → Ternura Azul (Top Voice n/a)
Re-release of Danny Marcel’s Ternura Azul (1974, Esquema 1239015). Identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo – Vol. 1 (1965, Itamaraty/CID ITAM 7024), Cláudio Marcelo’s Dance Suavemente (1965, Paladium 7004) and Conjunto Balambossa’s Não Quero Ver Você Triste (1966, Coledisc ‎CD 020). Also identical with Cláudio Marcelo’s Cláudio Marcelo e Seu Órgão (1966, Destaque ‎C-7024) except for track Adventures in Paradise.


1996

Don Pablo de Havana → Cha Cha Cha (Musidisc 777.7031)
Re-release of Bolero Espetacular aka Cha Cha Cha Espetacular (1960, Musidisc XPL-1)